The AJ List: The 9 Best Raft Trips In The Lower 48

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3. Upper Youghiogheny, Maryland and Pennsylvania

The Upper Yough, cutting through one of the few wilderness canyons in the East, is one of the wildest stretches of river in the U.S.: It starts with a mild section and a few warmup rapids, then boaters hit five miles of continuous rapids up to Class V, 20 in all. The river can only be run during releases from the Deep Creek Dam—of which there are about 60 on the published schedule, April through October.

Much more here.

In the wake of two deaths, 28 accidents, police stress boating, swimming safety

Michael A. Sawyers

Cumberland Times-News

— MCHENRY — A boater or swimmer or water skier is just as dead whether he or she drowns in the Chesapeake Bay or Deep Creek Lake and Maryland Natural Resources Police officials say there is too much of that going on.

Thursday morning NRP and Maryland Park Service representatives gathered at Sandy Point State Park near Annapolis to point out the problem as well as the solutions.

Two people drowned in Maryland during the July 4 weekend. Twenty-eight boating accidents were reported during the past two weekends.

At Sandy Point, water users were told how to avoid accidents and how to deal with them should the need arise.

During 14 years of dealing with the same issues, but on Mountain Maryland’s Deep Creek Lake, if Sgt. Jeff Sweitzer hasn’t seen it all he has come pretty close.

“So far this year there have been nine reportable accidents at the lake, one involving a capsized boat, one a boating collision and the others involving injuries to water skiers or tubers,” Sweitzer said on Thursday.

The capsizing took place May 24 when three adults and one 4-year-old were on a rental boat that overturned. There were no injuries.

The collision was between a pontoon vessel and a motorboat. There were 11 people aboard the two vessels and none was injured.

A 48-year-old female broke a shoulder bone when she was thrown from a tube being towed and struck the water.

“It’s common for a group of kids to be towed on a tube and the tube hits a wake or other rough water and one child’s knee strikes another child in the head, things like that,” Sweitzer said.

No matter the size of a boat, there must be one wearable life jacket for each passenger. Boats of 16 feet or greater must have a qualifying throwable life preserver as well.

Although there is no speed limit on the main body of the lake, U.S. Coast Guard rules require an operator to be able to stop the boat within half the distance that can be seen ahead.

“Obviously at night you can’t see very far ahead and that’s when speeding is a real danger,” Sweitzer said.

A number of years ago, Sweitzer was on night patrol when a speeding boat came dangerously close to a fishing boat. Sweitzer began a pursuit.

“The boat was going so fast that it became unsafe for me to continue at that rate,” Sweitzer said. “So I kept on course, but slower.”

Pretty soon Sweitzer heard a man in the water screaming for help.

“It was one of the people who had been on the boat and had fallen without the others knowing it,” he said. “I picked him up and found out that there were nine family members on the boat and they had been drinking heavily. In fact, the man was so intoxicated that he couldn’t recognize where we were on the lake even though he had been coming there all his life.”

Sweitzer said he operated the boat along the shoreline until the man recognized the family boat at a dock.

“We walked up to the house and they were still partying and still didn’t know the man was missing,” Sweitzer said. “In fact, a couple of them argued with me that I hadn’t actually rescued the man.”

Charges followed.

The weekend of June 27-29, known as Operation Dry Water, was one of intense water safety patrol on lakes and rivers throughout the United States.

At Deep Creek Lake, on those dates, officers contacted 436 boats, made 320 safety checks, responded to three accidents, issued 32 citations and 119 warnings. There were no arrests for operating a boat while influenced by alcohol.

That changed on the July 4 weekend when there were 18 alcohol violations and two accidents.

The Maryland Natural Resources Police has investigated nine water-related fatalities so far this year. The total for all of last year was 19 fatalities. Those numbers do not include deaths handled by local jurisdictions, such as the two swimming fatalities in Ocean City last month, or accidents that occurred at private establishments.

This year, the victims range in age from 22 to 56. They include a commercial waterman, three swimmers, four men boating in protected waters and an inexperienced kayaker on a miles-wide stretch of the Potomac River.

Thursday at Sandy Hook, Col. George F. Johnson IV, superintendent of the Maryland Natural Resources Police, offered these safety tips for swimmers.

• Obey lifeguards and law enforcement officers. Heed warning signs and flags.

• Insist that young children or inexperienced swimmers wear a well-fitting Coast Guard-approved life jacket in and the around water.

• Make sure an adult watches children and the elderly when at water’s edge. Keep young children within arm’s reach. If more than one adult is in attendance, take turns being the “Designated Kid Watcher.”

• Swim sober and never swim alone.

• Stay alert and check local weather conditions. Carry a cell phone.

• Make sure you have enough energy to swim back to shore.

Sweitzer offered a couple tips of his own for users of Deep Creek Lake.

Tip 1 — Follow all the safety rules for water users.

Tip 2 — NRP considers enforcement of those rules a high priority for the popular mountain lake.

Contact Michael A. Sawyers at msawyers@times-news.com.

More here.

Dog-Gone FUNdraiser TODAY

Dog-Gone FUNdraiser

The Garrett County Humane Society 15th Annual Dog-Gone FUNdraiser will be held on Saturday, July 12, at Garrett College. Admission is free! Family friendly event with lots to see and do! Here are just some of the activities that we have planned.

» Large Silent Auction
» Cash and Carry gift area
» Meet the Breed Tent: 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
» Bunny Town ($): 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
» Face painting ($): 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
» Snack bar: 9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
» Nail trim/ears (donation)
» Raffle tickets (3 cash winners!)
» Admission and parking are always free.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

From doughnuts to wall hangings at TriState Festival

Posted: Thursday, July 10, 2014 3:28 pm

The TriState Festival, Auction & Cruise-In is a great two-day family affair to be held in the convention hall at the Garrett County Fairgrounds, 270 Mosser Road, McHenry, Maryland. Celebrate the spirit of helping others in the U.S. and worldwide at this giant benefit sponsored by area Mennonite churches.

Beginning July 18, a giant silent auction will be on hand to greet enthusiastic buyers with more than 200 items including a chain saw and train tickets, collectibles, plants and much more. A market place will offer fair-trade handicrafts from around the world at the Ten Thousand Villages table as well as baked goods, plants, woven rugs, crib quilts, homemade jellies and both new and used books.

More here.

Storm causes road closures in Garrett

Elaine Blaisdell

Cumberland Times-News

— OAKLAND — State Park, Spring Lick and Steyer Mine Roads in Garrett County are still closed in the wake of Tuesday’s thunderstorm, but the roads will reopen soon, according to John Frank, director of the Garrett County Department of Public Safety & Emergency Management.

Fifteen roads throughout the county were closed Tuesday due to fallen trees. A majority of the roads affected were in the northern end of the county and in the Deep Creek Lake area.

“I’m just totally amazed at the volunteer fire departments last night. They were quick to respond and they put themselves in harm’s way to open the roadways,” said Frank.

The National Weather Ser-vice office in Pittsburgh determined that the wind speed at the Garrett County Airport was 48 mph and it was clocked at 70 mph in the upper atmosphere, according to Frank.

The Garrett County 911 Center received at least 100 calls during the storm pertaining to downed lines and trees but no injuries were sustained and there weren’t any fires caused by the storm, said Frank.

The  storm caused county administration phone lines to go down as well as U.S. Cellular and AT&T cell phone services. AT&T cell phone service remained out Wednesday in the Finzel area and along Interstate 68 in the county, according to Frank.

Maryland Emergency Management Agency is monitoring the situation in the county and has personnel available if needed.

The National Weather Service is assessing damage in Morgantown, W.Va., in an effort to verify whether a tornado struck that area, said Frank.

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com.

More here.

Local ‘most beautiful person’ contest to be held

The 2014 Garrett County’s Most Beautiful Person contest is accepting nominations until August 29.

The Garrett County’s Most Beautiful Person contest is for those who via acts of kindness and concern enriched the lives of citizens.

Each year, a search for unsung heroes is conducted. The heroes include folks of any age who volunteer to help others.

The program is 28 years old and hosted by the Board of Garrett County Commissioners.

To obtain a nomination form, visit www.garrettcounty.org or call Carol A. Riley-Alexander at 301-334-8970.

The award is based on volunteer service only.

More here.

Garrett County canvass confirms election victories

All three incumbents lose to challengers in commission race

From Staff Reports

Cumberland Times-News

— OAKLAND — Election canvass results confirm that all three of the current Garrett County commissioners were ousted by newcomers in the primary election.

Paul Edwards defeated in-cumbent Jim Raley in District 2, with 50.55 percent of the vote, or a total of 2,010 to Raley’s 1,009, according to the official results.

In District 1, Larry Tichnell unseated incumbent Gregan Crawford, garnering 49.19 percent of the votes with a total of 1,918 to Crawford’s 1,105 votes.

Tichnell will square off against Leo Martin, a Libertarian, in the November general election.

In District 3, Jim Hinebaugh beat incumbent Bob Gatto by 3.46 percent of the votes. Earning 36.76 percent of the votes, Hinebaugh had a total of 1,486 votes to Gatto’s 1,346 votes. Hinebaugh will face Democratic candidate April Hebden, who received a total of 655 votes, as well as Bill Welch, a Libertarian, and James R. “Smokey” Stanton, unaffiliated, in the general election.

District 3 Board of Education candidate Monica Rinker led the way with 2,394 votes, followed by Fred Gregg with 1,742 votes and incumbent Rodney Reckart with 765 votes. Rinker and Gregg will move on to the general election with District 1 candidates Stuart Harvey and Mathew Paugh, incumbent, and District 2 candidate Thomas Carr, incumbent. District 1 and 2 candidates will advance to the general election because there is only one candidate from District 2 and two candidates from District 1. There is one open seat in each of the three districts.

State’s Attorney Lisa Thayer Welch received 3,008 votes. Clerk of Circuit Court Timothy Miller received 3,199. Both ran unopposed. Register of Wills Rita L. Watson also ran unopposed with 3,322 votes.

Sheriff candidates Skyler Hebden, Democrat, and incumbent Robert Corley, Republican, received 583 votes and 3,455 votes, respectively. Hebden and Corley will face off in the general election.

In the race for Judge of Orphans’ Court, Fred Sanders led over incumbent Wayne Wilt with 2,769 votes to 2,732 votes.

Jeff Hovis was the only candidate who ran for Democratic Central Committee with 686 votes. In the Republican Central Committee race, Brenda Butscher led with 2,441 votes, followed by Ruth Hinebaugh Umbel, 2,355 votes; Brian Schlossnagle 2,203; Bill Bittinger 2,169; Tom Sheahen 1,830; DeCorsey Bolden 1,716; Bill Schrider and John Pucciano both had 1,518 votes.

More here.

Fishing Maryland’s Deep Creek Lake

By  in Outdoors | July 08, 2014 at 1:36PM

Fishing Deep Creek Lake can be a cool down from what you're normally used to in the summertime

Fishing Deep Creek Lake can be a cool down from what you’re normally used to in the summertime

MCHENRY, Md. — The first thing you notice is the cool air. Nestled in the western mountains of Maryland, not far from the West Virginia border, is a unique lake which can be a gem for a summer retreat.

Deep Creek Lake is a highland reservoir that features attributes normally confined to the deep south.

“It has characteristics of each,” said Brent Nelson, a longtime guide on the lake. “You go really far south into Turkey Neck and Green Glade you feel like you’re in a southern impoundment. there’s a lot of meadow grass, lily pads, and cattails. Then you get down to the dam you get that rocky shoreline and it looks like a highland reservoir. We have two very different types of habitat on the lake.”

More here.

Local chamber of commerce launches new website

For the Cumberland Times-News

— MCHENRY, Md. — The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce recently launched a new version of its website, visitdeepcreek.com, incorporating the new County brand, “Deep Creek Experience.”

The redesigned site offers chamber members and visitors new technological functionality that makes using the site, accessing member information and planning a Garrett County getaway easier.

“We are excited to announce the launch of the new visitdeepcreek.com utilizing our new brand,” said Nicole Christian, chamber president and CEO, via news release. “It is fresh, easy to navigate, and technologically superior by featuring a design that automatically adjusts its format to the device that’s being used whether it’s a desktop, smartphone or tablet. Visitdeepcreek.com is the starting point for anyone planning their Deep Creek Experience and is loaded with resources for Chamber member businesses and local residents.”

The new site includes a redesigned layout & navigation, more graphics, a four-season photo gallery, featured specials and easy-to-use functionality.

Along with serving as a guide to current and potential tourists to the Deep Creek Lake area and Garrett County, the website also includes information specifically for current and prospective Chamber members, including membership information and events, advertising and a log-in area for members to update their business information, add events and specials.

Visitors to the site can easily search for any chamber member using the business directory search located on the top left of the home page and every page on the site. And the new visitdeepcreek.com is also a responsive website so it automatically adjusts to whatever platform a visitor is using to access it – mobile, tablet or desktop.

Along with information on the history of Deep Creek Lake and Garrett County, the new site showcases Garrett County’s small towns by highlighting each town in Northern and Southern Garrett County. Plus, the site also includes a link to the new Mountain Maryland Gateway to the West Heritage Area website, garrettheritage.com.

More here.

Couple injured in motorcycle crash with bear

From Staff Reports

Cumberland Times-News

— OAKLAND — A Westminster couple was injured Tuesday when they were thrown from their motorcycle after striking a bear on Herrington Manor Road, according to the Garrett County Sheriff’s Office.

William Wantz, 59, and Debra Wantz, 58, were both taken to the hospital for treatment of unspecified injuries following the 11:15 a.m. crash.

Police said William Wantz was riding a 2007 Harley-Davidson with Debra Wantz as a passenger when the bear entered the southbound lane. Wantz was unable to avoid striking the 75-pound bear, which was killed.

Southern Garrett Rescue Squad and Oakland Volunteer Fire Department  responded.

More here.

Nearly $1.7 million for Garrett Head Start

Elaine Blaisdell

Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the Garrett County Community Action Committee with a $1,696,669 grant for Head Start. Head Start is a federal program that promotes school readiness for children under 5 from low-income households.

“Head Start is a major priority for Community Action and we have been working on it for a number of years,” said Duane Yoder, president of GCCAC.

The Head Start program runs from Feb. 1 to Jan. 30 and if it’s prorated it’s the largest grant that GCCAC has received, according to Yoder.

“Today’s announcement of the HHS Head Start grant for Garrett County Community Action is good news for my constituents in Maryland’s westernmost county,” said 6th District Congressman John Delaney on Monday. “Head Start is one of our most important federal programs because supporting early education clearly benefits both individual children and our society as a whole. Every child in America deserves a world-class education and an opportunity to pursue the American dream.

“I have been impressed by the work done by the Garrett County Community Action Committee, which is a tremendous on-the-ground resource for the people of Garrett County in implementing federal programs and helping people in need. Partnerships that combine federal resources with local expertise can often produce better results, especially with a dedicated staff such as the one at the GCCAC.”

GCCAC has an Early Head Start program which is for children up to age 3 and the Head Start program is for ages 3 to 4. The Early Head Start, which has 80 children enrolled, has the largest waiting list and the Head Start program has 220 children enrolled, according to Yoder.

“The Head Start school readiness scores for children coming out of Head Start, which is for low- to moderate-income students, are the same as the rest of the population. We are the only place in the state that has scores that are the same as the rest of the population,” said Yoder.

Last year, the Head Start program closed for a month due to the federal government sequestration and during that time the school readiness scores dropped, according to Yoder.

“We have worked very hard on this and have 11 different classes around the county and have infant home visiting,” said Yoder.

The majority of the classrooms are at the Dennett Road facility and there are classrooms at Friendsville, Grantsville, Accident, Kitzmiller, Crellin and the Overlook Child Development Center in Oakland.

Founded in 1965, GCCAC is a private nonprofit corporation that provides services to Garrett County residents. It is governed by a 15-member board of directors composed of community leaders. Delaney toured its headquarters in Oakland earlier this year and met with Yoder to discuss the organization’s needs and priorities.

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com.

More here.

Garrett County B-52 crash to be commemorated

For the Cumberland Times-News

Cumberland Times-News

GRANTSVILLE — A B-52 bomber with a crew of five and two thermonuclear bombs crashed in a snow storm on Big Savage Mountain, near Grantsville, Garrett County, on January 13, 1964.

The result was a massive search for the location of the plane, and for the crew, four of whom had ejected from the plane.

The military was heavily involved in the search and rescue, but the people of Garrett and Allegany Counties in Maryland and Somerset County, Pennsylvania joined in to walk through deep snow looking for parachutes, plough the roads for the search personnel to travel more easily, run telephone line and feed the large number of people participating.

A collection of news stories is now online at digital.whilbr.org, the history website of Western Maryland Regional Library.

There are stories published at the time by the Cumberland newspapers, the Cumberland Evening Times, Cumberland News, Cumberland Sunday Times and later the Cumberland Times-News, together with The Republican from Oakland, Garrett County.

Both towns also reported on all commemorative events. In addition there are several in-depth articles about the events, bringing the perspective of time to the story.

The website allows one to see how the events of that very cold and eventful January were reported at the time, with the concern for human lives but also the initial fear of the potential nuclear threat that the bombs posed. One can read the stories chronologically, using the browse feature or search for an individual.

The crash of the B-52 will be commemorated Saturday, July 12, 2014 in Grantsville.

The stories are available at http://digital.whilbr.org or from the Allegany County Library System’s website  http://www.alleganycountylibrary.info <http://www.relib.net>  under “Research.”

The Whilbr website features images of original source documents from the collections of the public libraries, historical societies, and individuals in Western Maryland.  Its purpose is to display Western Maryland-related historical documents, images, audio, and video.

Western Maryland Regional Library provides support and materials for the continued enhancement of resources available through the Allegany County Library System, the Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, and the Washington County Free Library System.

More here.

New listing! 711 Lakeshore Drive – 6BR, Type A dock, sandy beach area, all day sun & sunsets – GA8388900

One of the best lots & settings at Deep Creek Lake. Very private cove with deep water and a ultra rare SANDY beach. Sun-drenched dock enjoys all-day sun & breath-taking sunsets. Full-time residence that has every improvement & convenience needed for lakefront living and many thoughtful features for year-round enjoyment. Must see to appreciate all that this home offers! By appointment only. Much more here.
Listing Information
Property Type: Single Family-Detached
6 4 Full/1 Half
32,460 Sq. Ft. 3,484 (approx) 1995
Yes- 2 spaces 3
LAKE SHORE DRIVE
Well
Public Sewer
School Information
CALL SCHOOL BOARD SOUTHERN MIDDLE SOUTHERN HIGH SCHOOL
Room Information
Bathrooms
4 1
Kit-Dining Combo, Eat-In Kitchen
Interior Features
Dishwasher, Dryer, Microwave, Stove, Refrigerator, Washer, Disposal
 Propane, Wood, Other, Other, Baseboard, Zone, Stove, Hot Water
Full, Fully Finished, Improved, Heated, Other, Walkout Level
 1
 Other, Lvl Entry-Main, None
Attach Mstr Bath, Attic-Strs Pull Dwn, Bath Ceramic Tile, Entry Lvl BR, MBA/Sep Tub, MBA/Sep Shwr, MBR-BA Full, Master Walk-in Closet, Other, Other, MBRs-Multiple, Tub-2 + person, W/W Carpeting, Walk-in Closet(s), Washer/Dryer Hookup, Wd Stove Insrt, Wpool Jets
Exterior / Lot Features
 Deck, Dock Facilities, Water Access
 2 Garage Spaces, Garage
Wood, Stone, Cedar
None
Water
DEEP CREEK LAKE
98
R
Level, Moderate Slope
Shows Well
 Deck, Porch-front, Porch, Private Pier, Backs to Trees, Water Front, Trees/Wooded, Private, Water View, Water Access
Driving Directions
From TaylorMade Deep Creek Vacations & Sales, turn south on Garrett Hwy. Right on Lakeshore Dr after 219 Bridge. Home is on the right, #711.
Financial Considerations
Fee Simple
1218028840
$9,743
2013

Much more here.

A Different Kind of Rainbow

A different kind of rainbow was on display following one of the fundraising events that was part of the annual William G. Weissgerber Benefit Golf Tournament, held Friday and Saturday in McHenry and in Oakland. This photo was taken at the conclusion of the 5-K Color Run, during which participants were coated with colored dye. With the rainbow known as a symbol of hope, the 5-K run specifically raised funds for Samantha for the Arts, a program founded in memory of Samantha Gibson that provides additional arts funding in the local school system. The WGW tournament, and various other companion fundraising activities, supports not only Samantha for the Arts, but also Landon’s Library and the Andrew Woods Memorial Scholarship program. According to tournament organizers, the overall effort once again yielded proceeds of approximately $100,000, but the final tally had not yet been tabulated by presstime today. The winning golf tournament team and other tournament results can be found in today’s sports pages.

Much more here.

Art in the park planned

TIMES-NEWS: SLICE OF LIFE

Cumberland Times-News

DEEP CREEK LAKE — The Western Garrett County State Park Volunteers Inc. and the Garrett County Arts Council will host the 15th annual Art in the Park July 12 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and July 13 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the park.

The event will be held rain or shine and feature more than 45 artists, including several new to the festival, who display and sell their work. Entertainment, food, naturalist programs and a children’s art tent are among featured activities.

“Art in the Park is an event for the entire family to enjoy,” said Caroline Blizzard, volunteer coordinator of Western Garrett County State Park Volunteers Inc. “Beautiful artwork, hands-on activities, delicious food will delight children and parents alike. We are proud to offer such programs that can bring family, fun, art and education together.”

The variety of artistic and handmade pieces at the event will include jewelry, photography, wood turned items, native wildflowers, pottery, fused glass, original artwork, wood painted furniture, handmade wooden furniture, tatting, homemade chocolates, hand-woven baskets, wool rugs, handmade soaps and children’s books.

A silent auction July 12 will include artwork donated by vendors. Animals from frogs and turtles to birds of prey may be viewed in the park tent. The annual tie dye of the 2014 Art in the Park T-shirt will also be held. The arts council will display and sell tickets for its annual quilt fundraiser and operate a children’s art and activity tent.

Food will be available and a variety of hands-on activities will be held.

In addition, visitors can explore the interpretive/educational Discovery Center, open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily during the summer.

Admission is the usual charge into Deep Creek Lake State Park. Children in car seats and seniors over 62 are free. Docking is available for those wishing to come by boat.

For more information, call 301-387-7067.

More here.

Garrett school board approves consolidation recommendations

From Staff Reports

Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — The Garrett County Board of Education voted to approve the six consolidation recommendations made by the School Attendance Area Committee. The 4-0 vote was taken during a special business session Tuesday. Matthew Paugh, associate member, wasn’t present during the meeting.

The recommendations will assign a boundary for the 2014/2015 school year to Swan Meadow Elementary School using the existing transportaion routes and will allow students currently attending Swan Meadow to continue to do so. Students who currently attend Yough Glades Elementary School will have the option of remaining there or attending Swan Meadow. The recommendations also suggest that Swan Meadow’s goal of enrolling 12 additional students be reviewed in April 2015 and that the kindergarten program at the school be implemented for the 2014/2015 school year.

An additional recommendation includes assigning the mobile modular classrooms, already approved by the board and the Garrett County commissioners, to Broad Ford Elementary School. Another recommendation includes reassigning the Glades West to Tomar Drive area to the Crellin district.

The consolidation plan has been a challenge, Jane Wildesen, supervisor of elementary education for the board and a member of the committee, said in a previous interview with the Times-News.

Bus transportation will remain as is and will not be extended to encompass any of the proposed changes for the school year. Any student who can use established routes will continue to be provided that bus service.

Crellin and Swan Meadow start and end times will be adjusted to be consistent with the remaining elementary schools in the county beginning with this school year. Parents/guardians of students who attend Crellin and Swan Meadow schools will be notified how the time change will affect their children as the school year approaches.

The consolidation plan in its entirety can be viewed at http://www.garrettcountyschools.org/news/2014/06/-board-of-education-approves-committees-recommendations.

More here.

Fireworks will light up Deep Creek Lake

marcia-fireworksPhoto by Marcia Warnick, 4 Wheels Photography

Cumberland Times-News

— MCHENRY — Fireworks will light up the sky at Deep Creek Lake July Fourth at the annual Fire on the Mountain display presented by the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce.

GCC Technologies LLC is the major sponsor for the 2014 display, which is set to begin at dark. The shells are launched from the top of the Bear Claw Tubing Park at Wisp Resort.

Prime viewing locations include the scenic overlook on U.S. Route 219, Wisp Resort and from a boat on the lake, particularly around McHenry Cove.

“I would like to thank GCC Technologies for their sponsorship of the Fire on the Mountain fireworks display,” said Nicole Christian, president and CEO of the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce. “We could not present such a fabulous show without the support of GCC Technologies and our other generous fireworks sponsors.”

The rain date for the event is July 5.

For more information, visit the website www.visitdeepcreek.com or call 301-387-4386.

More here.

A quarter of registered Garrett County voters ousted commissioners

Elaine Blaisdell

Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — About one-quarter of Garrett County’s registered voters decided the fate of the three Republican commissioners who were unseated Tuesday, according to complete but unofficial primary election results.

The voting turnout was at 25.26 percent, including early voting, according to results reported by the county to the State Board of Elections.

Paul Edwards ousted incumbent Jim Raley in District 2, with 50.5 percent of the votes, or a total of 1,933 votes to Raley’s 961 votes.

Edwards didn’t return a call for comment by press time.

Edwards will run unopposed in the November general election.

Edwards has 15 years in municipal government in Grantsville and is currently director of secondary education for Garrett County Public Schools. He will step down from  his 10-year mayoral position in Grantsville.

In District 1, Larry Tichnell unseated incumbent Gregan Crawford, garnering 49.28 percent of the votes with a total of 1,850 to Crawford’s 1,055 votes.

“I appreciate all the people that voted for me. I was surprised to win as handily as I did because there was a lot of good candidates in my district,” said Tichnell. “Thanks to everybody for their support and appreciation. I look forward to the election in November.”

Tichnell will square off against Leo Martin, a Libertarian, in the November general election.

In District 3, Jim Hinebaugh beat incumbent Bob Gatto by 2.78 percent of the votes. Earning 36.48 percent of the votes, Hinebaugh had a total of 1,419 votes to Gatto’s 1,311 votes. Hinebaugh will face Democratic candidate April Hebden, who received a total of 626 votes, as well as Bill Welch, a Libertarian, and James R. “Smokey” Stanton, unaffiliated, in the general election.

“Obviously, I’m very pleased to win. It was a pretty tight race,” said Hinebaugh. “I’m pleased with the outcome — it’s closer than I would have liked but I’m happy I won. I’m looking forward to the general election in November.”

Calls to Raley, Crawford and Gatto weren’t returned by press time.

District 3 Board of Education candidate Monica Rinker led the way with 2,319 votes, followed by Fred Gregg with 1,665 votes and incumbent Rodney Reckart with 735 votes. Rinker and Gregg will move on to the general election with District 1 candidates Stuart Harvey and Mathew Paugh, incumbent, and District 2 candidate Thomas Carr, incumbent. District 1 and 2 candidates will go straight to the general election because there is only one candidate from District 2 and two candidates from District 1. There is only one open seat in each of the three districts.

State’s Attorney Lisa Thayer Welch received 2,896 votes. Clerk of Circuit Court Timothy Miller received 3,080. Both ran unopposed. Register of Wills Rita L. Watson also ran unopposed with 3,188 votes.

Sheriff candidates Skyler Hebden, D, and incumbent Robert Corley, R, received 556 votes and 3,322 votes, respectively. Hebden and Corley will face off in the general election.

In the race for Judge of Orphans’ Court, Fred Sanders led over incumbent Wayne Wilt with 2,665 votes to 2,619 votes.

Jeff Hovis was the only candidate who ran for Democratic Central Committee with 652 votes. In the Republican Central Committee race, Brenda Butscher led with 2,357 votes, followed by Ruth Hinebaugh Umbel, 2,274 votes; Brian Schlossnagle 2,128; Bill Bittinger 2,099; Tom Sheahen 1,759; DeCorsey Bolden 1,640; Bill Schrider 1,522; and John Pucciano, 1,467.

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com.

More here.

Garrett County citizens vote commissioners out of office

Elaine Blaisdell

Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — Garrett County’s three sitting Republican commissioners were unseated Tuesday, according to complete but unofficial primary election results.

In District 1, Larry Tichnell, with 1,850 votes, won out over incumbent Gregan Crawford, who finished with 1,055 votes. Also in District 1, Eric Robison had 289 votes, Andrew Scott Harvey 250 votes and Dan Brenneman 310 votes.

In District 2, Paul Edwards led the way with 1,933 votes, followed by incumbent Jim Raley with 961, Tim Thomas with 753 and Gary Barlow with 181. Barlow suspended his campaign but remained on the ballot.

In District 3, Jim Hinebaugh, with 1,419 votes, beat incumbent Bob Gatto with 1,311. Also in District 3, Dave Beard, 538 votes; Jeff Haines, 484 votes; and Chad Maroney, 138. April Hebden, the lone Democrat in any of the three commission races, had 626 votes.

In District 1, Tichnell will face off against Leo Martin, a libertarian, in the November general election. In District 3, Hinebaugh will face off against candidate Hebden, Bill Welch, a libertarian and James R. “Smokey” Stanton, unaffiliated in the general election. In District 2, Edwards will run unopposed.

District 3 Board of Education candidate Monica Rinker led the way with 2,319 votes, followed by Fred Gregg and incumbent Rodney Reckart’s 1,665 and 735 votes, respectively.

Rinker and Reckart will move on to the general election  with District 1 candidates Stuart Harvey and Mathew Paugh and incumbent and District 2 candidate Thomas Carr, incumbent. Board candidates from District 1 and 2 will go straight to the general election because there is only one candidate from District 2 and two candidates from District 1.

There is only one open seat in each of the three districts.

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com.

More here.

New listing! 2474 Marsh Hill Road – 4/5 BR log chalet with dock – GA8385918

IMMACULATE 4/5BR log home at Waterside at Wisp, with dock slip. 3,600+/- sq ft of living area, spread over an open & inviting chalet floor plan. Perfect location for year round activities on Marsh Hill Rd – just 2 miles from Wisp. Custom concrete driveway, attached garage, 2 huge living rooms, 2 fireplaces, eat-in kitchen, wrap around porch/deck, wet bar & more! More here.
Listing Information
Property Type: Single Family-Detached
4 4 Full/1 Half
47,480 Sq. Ft. 3,600 (approx) 2001
Yes- 1 space 3
WATERSIDE AT WISP
Public
Public Sewer
School Information
CALL SCHOOL BOARD
Room Information
Bathrooms
4 1
Sep Dining Rm
Interior Features
 Propane, Forced Air, Other
Fully Finished
 2
 None, Other
Exterior / Lot Features
 Deck, Dock Facilities, Spa, Water Access
 1 Garage Spaces, Drvwy/Off Str, Garage
Stone, Log
Boat Slip
None
DEEP CREEK LAKE
0
Moderate Slope
Shows Well
 Deck
Driving Directions
From Taylor-Made DCV&S, turn on Sang Run Rd, left on Marsh Hill. Follow 2.4 miles to home on right.
Financial Considerations
$883 Annually
Fee Simple
1218048116
$5,409
2013

Much more here.

New listing! 1333 Deep Creek Drive – Lakefront townhome- Mountain View – GA8385901

Mountain View #8 is a vibrant and airy 3 bedroom townhome that will captivate you with water & slope views! With 3 levels of living space, there is more than ample room for everyone to spread out. This townhome is ideally located within walking distance to area dining and activities. Dock slip available through HOA. Reasonably priced, furnishings convey, established vacation rental. More here.
This property is a vacation rental! More here.
Listing Information
Property Type: Single Family-Attached
3 3 Full
1,563 (approx) 1989 3
MOUNTAINVIEW
Public
Public Sewer
School Information
CALL SCHOOL BOARD NORTHERN NORTHERN GARRETT HIGH
Room Information
Bathrooms
3
Kit-Dining Combo, Kit-Living Combo, Liv-Din Combo
Interior Features
 Electric Heating, Forced Air
Connecting Stairway, Fully Finished, Walkout Level
 1
Floor Plan-Traditional, Furniture Conveys, Other, Other, W/W Carpeting, Washer/Dryer Hookup
Exterior / Lot Features
 Dock Facilities, Water Access
 Assigned
Wood
Boat Slip
None
Water
DEEP CREEK LAKE
0
Shows Well
Driving Directions
From Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales, take Towne Center Way to Deep Creek Drive. Mountain View community is on your right.
Financial Considerations
Condo
1218054639
$4,619
2013

Much more here.

 

Bicycling for charity

Race Across America covers 3,000

Vickie GriffithsCumberland Times-News

GARRETT COUNTY — Race Across America contestant Chris “Hoppo” Hopkinson, of North Yorkshire, United Kingdom, tackles a hill on Rt. 40 in Garrett County on Friday.

The race, which covers 3,000 miles from Oceanside, California to Annapolis, Maryland, raises funds for a variety of charities.

Team Hoppo is sponsoring Fraja Ellie, a 5-year-old girl from North Yorkshire who is fighting neuroblastoma.

For more about the race, visit www.raceacrossamerica.org.

More here.

Past and present intersect in Grantsville

This stretch of U.S. 40 in Garrett County includes an artisan village, a stone bridge and a restaurant with a lot of character

June 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun

GRANTSVILLE — — In a cabin built in the 1750s, just a few hundred feet from a 201-year-old stone bridge across the quiet Casselman River, a man sits at a slab of a wooden table, an array of carving tools spread before him.

The rush of traffic from nearby Alternate U.S. 40, also known as Route 40, does not bother Gary Yoder. Nor does the “thump-thump-thump” of the weaving loom from the cabin next door.

The most celebrated crafter of wooden bird sculptures in Western Maryland is too engrossed to notice.

“What I do is more like an addiction than a career — a healthy one, I hope,” he says, glancing up from a hawk feather he’s carving from a piece of basswood.

Yoder has been practicing his craft at the Spruce Forest Artisans Village — a cluster of working artists’ studios a mile from downtown Grantsville — for 42 of his 55 years.

More here.

Health implications of fracking focus of Garrett meeting

June 28 event open to public

For the Cumberland Times-News

Cumberland Times-News

— MCHENRY — A public presentation on the health implications of fracking to be held June 28 from 2 to 4:30 p.m. in the Garrett College auditorium will include time for community comments and questions.

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside.

Dr. Sacoby Wilson, Dr. Amir Sapkota and other team members from the University of Maryland’s Institute for Applied Environmental Health will deliver the presentation. “We are looking forward to reporting to the community on our results, conclusions and recommendations,” Wilson said.

Last fall, Wilson and his team met with community members to compile a list of issues and questions they wanted addressed by the public health study. The comments made in those meetings were written up and are available to read at www.marcellushealth.org.

This is also an opportunity to hear more about the work of Maryland’s Marcellus Shale Advisory Commission.

Representatives of the Allegany and Garrett county health departments will be present.

The June 28 meeting will be an opportunity to understand existing threats to Allegany and Garrett County air quality and why citizens may want to be trained to conduct their own air quality monitoring in addition to that being done by the state.

Pre-existing environmental threats need to be documented, so that if fracking is permitted, officials and scientists can determine if new problems with air, soil or water contamination are emerging. For public health purposes, it will be important to know if illnesses can be attributed to any phases of gas extraction and production.

The meeting is hosted by the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park. MIAEH requests an RSVP atmeleahboyle@gmail.com.

More here.